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    Vector Insights

    20 April 2018

    Going Green for Gold

    Arian Neiron, Managing Director

    Recent research findings reveal compelling reasons to include companies with high environmental, social and governance (ESG) ratings in portfolios. Like Australia at the recent Commonwealth Games, these high ESG performers can lead the pack.


    Vector Insights

    by Russel Chesler , Director, Investments & Portfolio Strategy

    Pessimists view the Hayne Royal Commission into the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services sector as a reason to avoid bank shares. There is an opposing view that bank shares have been oversold and this scrutiny and price weakness presents a buying opportunity and that banks will emerge stronger. ETFs allow investors to play either view.

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    Vector Insights

    by Brad Livingstone-Foggo , Head of Marketing - Australia

    As any sports tipster knows – it’s very hard to pick all the winners every week. Likewise, if you tried, it would be impossible to get every tip wrong on purpose each week. Every single outcome is very difficult to predict and much is due to chance. Therefore, tipping involves luck. The same is true of investing. There is, however, an easy way to determine if your Australian equity manager is skilful or just lucky. It’s called persistence.

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    Vector Insights

    by Russell Grigg , General Counsel and Head of Compliance

    Sustainable investing has a long history. Today it is embraced by:

    • some of the world’s largest institutional investors who are committed to socially responsible and fossil fuel free investing; and
    • an international movement of investors that want to align their investments to their ethics and values.

    The evolution of the sustainable investing movement dates to the 18th Century, but the principles remain the same.

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    Vector Insights

    by Arian Neiron , Managing Director

    The last two weeks, contrary to pre-conceived notions put forward by those who have the most to lose, exchange traded funds (ETFs) did not exacerbate the market fluctuations, nor were they to blame for falls. In an effort to support this narrative some media outlets mistakenly referred to a derivatives-based exchange traded note as an ETF. However, such exchange traded notes, also referred universally under the umbrella term 'exchange traded products' (ETPs) are not ETFs. The differences are important to understand as the consequences for investors, as we've seen, can be severe.

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